Creating a High Performing Health System

Creating a High Performing Health System
Member Price: Free Non-Member Price: $15.00 Buy Now!
  Members, please log in to register.

Overview

Does this sound familiar: A NZD$17m (AUD$16m) deficit, rapidly rising demand, a hospital frequently in gridlock, an ageing workforce, and shortages of staff? Probably, and this was Canterbury Health System, New Zealand, in 2007. What happened to turn around an organisation that was evidently struggling, to becoming one of the top five performing organisations in the world?

A clearly articulated strategy based on three elements:

  • People take greater responsibility for their own health,
  • Patients stay well in their own homes and communities, and
  • People receive timely and appropriate complex care.

It was also the realisation that the patient’s time is actually the most important currency in healthcare and, if we value that, everything else will follow.

A more detailed description of the work of Canterbury Health System and the remarkable strides it has been made can be found here and will be presented at the forthcoming APNA conference.

In essence, patient time is the key metric of performance and quality is best measured from the perspective of the person. It is a journey not an event.

Presented by Brian Dolan

Brian Dolan trained as a psychiatric nurse in Ireland and did his general nursing at St Mary’s Hospital, London. Most of his clinical career was in emergency care as well as in academic general practice. He is Director of Health Service 360, which provides online 360 appraisals for nurses, doctors, AHPs and managers. He works with organisations undertaking leadership development, improvements in patient flow and systems reform. Brian is Director of Service Improvement, Canterbury District Health Board, NZ where his role includes running the Collabor8 lean thinking and leadership programme aimed at all staff across the Canterbury and West Coast health systems.

Cost: $15 inc GST / APNA Members FREE

Cart

Cart

Item removed. Undo